Traduire un texte anglais en français

Barême de notation
Généralement, les copies sont évaluées avec des « points fautes », c’est-à-dire qu’on vous attribue des points fautes en fonction de vos erreurs. Par exemple, 1 point pour une erreur d’orthographe; 2 points pour une erreur de grammaire; 3 points pour un faux sens; 4 points pour un contre-sens etc. A la fin de la correction, on additionne tous les points fautes. Vous obtenez alors par exemple un score de 120. Ce score est comparé aux scores qui étaient fixés pour avoir une note de 0, de 10 et de 20. On obtient alors une note sur 20. Par exemple, un score de 120 (alors qu’on avait fixé 85 pour avoir 10/20) vous donnerait une note d’environ 07/20.
Tout dépend du barème et des points fautes qui sont attribués par l’examinateur. Au niveau d’un examen ou d’un concours, ces points-fautes sont bien sûr harmonisés : tous les correcteurs utilisent le même barème.

CE QUI COUTE LE PLUS DE POINTS :
1) l’omission : vous ne comprenez pas un mot et vous faites comme si vous ne l’aviez pas vu. Vous êtes alors sanctionné au maximum, même s’il s’agit d’un point facile à traduire
2) le contre-sens : vous dites le contraire du texte
3) le faux-sens : vous changez légèrement le sens du texte.
4) Erreur de grammaire/de syntaxe
5) Orthographe

Eléments à avoir en tête avant de traduire :

– repérer la nature de l’extrait : article de presse, extrait de roman, …..

– ne pas changer de registre de langue entre l’anglais et le français : le niveau de langue se voit dans le vocabulaire et la grammaire employés

         – registre formel : Do you know who that girl is ?

         – registre neutre : Who is that girl ?

         – registre informel : Who is that chick ?

         – argot : Look at the hot blonde !

         – registre vulgaire : Look at that bitch !

         – registre tabou : the N or F-word : il n’y a guère de chances que vous y soyez confrontés !

Attention : quelle que soient vos difficultés, ne laissez jamais de blancs dans la traduction.

Procédés de traduction

Let's practise

1) Method of translation : ……………………………….

to swallow the pill = ……………………………….

to have a word on the tip of the tongue = ……………………………….

to draw to an end = ……………………………….

to see red = ……………………………….

2) Method of translation : ……………………………….

What’s up ? = ……………………………….

Mind your own business = ……………………………….

Great ! = ……………………………….

No kidding ?= ……………………………….

3) Method of translation : ……………………………….

They shook him awake= ……………………………..

He was scared to death = ………………………….

The baby cried himself to sleep = ………………………….

He flew round the world= ………………………………

4) Method of translation : ……………………………….

the hour of indulgence : ……………………………….

Yield : ……………………………….

endless : …………………………

5) Method of translation : ……………………………….

to sit to her meal = ………………………………….

Off the motorway, problems arise for the motorist = …………………………..

the wreck off Land’s End = …………………………………….

Text 1:

Drink, you see, was Father’s great weakness. He could keep steady for months, even for years, at a stretch, and while he did he was as good as gold. He was first up in the morning and brought the mother a cup of tea in bed, stayed at home in the evenings and read the paper; saved money and bought himself a new blue serge suit and bowler hat. He laughed at the folly of men who, week in week out, left their hard-earned money with the publicans; and sometimes to pass an idle hour, he took pencil and paper and calculated precisely how much he saved each week through being a teetotaller.

                                                                                                 The Drunkard by Frank O’Connor

Text 2:

Kangaroo blindness is nothing new – farmers have reported seeing it as far back as the 1920s – and may be nature’s culling technique. Australia’s burgeoning domestic kangaroo-meat market hasn’t been hurt; rightly so, say scientists, who have found out that the virus does not affect humans. Meanwhile, some blinded kangaroos are getting along in the wild despite their condition. « It all depends on how readily the animal adapts », says Eveleigh, « If they get used to do it quickly and have water and food handy, they can maintain a good body-condition and go on living. » That’s good news for the kangaroos; bad news for the vigilant, roo-dodging motorists of Broken Hill.

Time Australia, June 12th 1995

Text 3:

The train slowed down and the lights outside grew brighter. She moved towards his end of the carriage.
“Look here!” he stammered. “Shan’t I see you again?” He got up too, and leant against the rack with one hand. “I must see you again.” The train was stopping.
She said breathlessly, “I come down from London every evening.”
“You-you-you do-really?” His eagerness frightened her. He was quick to curb it. Shall we or shall we not shake hands? raced through his brain. One hand was on the door-handle, the other held the little bag. The train stopped. Without another word or glance she was gone.

                                                 Katherine Mansfield, Something Childish But Very Natural, 1914.